Hellens Gardens Looking East
Hellens Gardens Looking East
Bluebells - Hall Wood
Bluebells - Hall Wood
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East Garden Terrace
East Garden Terrace
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The East Terrace
The East Terrace

THE GARDENS

A romantic English Garden incorporating a rare 17th century octagonal dovecot, a physic garden,

a yew labyrinth, woodland and ponds, herb and kitchen gardens. Garden admission: £2.50 per person.

 

YEW LABYRINTH

The difference between a maze and a Labyrinth? You can’t get lost in a Labyrinth!

 

KNOT GARDEN

This is located on the East lawn and is inspired by designs from our James 1 over-mantle in the East Hall which was originally a bedhead.

 

ROSE GARDEN

On the north side of the House, several varieties alongside the greenhouses surrounded by many fruit trees.

 

TREES

Ranging from the ancient Wellingtonias, Blue Atlas Cedars to the many rare varieties of fruit trees.

 

DRIVEWAY (Monks Walk)

The Perry Pear trees which were planted as an avenue in 1702 to celebrate the coronation of Queen Anne, still survive. Most are Hellens Early variety but there is a rare Hellens Green and Waterlugg both of which we are trying to graft here to help preserve the species.

 

CREATION OF WILDFLOWER MEADOW

We have started the process of turning the grass verges on the driveway into wildflower meadows.  To do this, we have to remove the existing vegetation as neither the grass types or perennial weeds are conducive to the establishment of meadows.  We are using herbicide responsibly to achieve this.  We plan to begin the sowing of the new meadows in Autumn 2017.  For a period of about a year we at Hellens and our visitors will experience a little ‘pain’  in order that we can enjoy a much larger gain.  Not only will wildflower meadows  both sides of the drive look stunning  but also the greater diversity of flower species will enhance the environment for wildlife, especially pollinators. We intend to relay this information publicly, using ‘interpretation’ boards on the drive. I hope our intentions are clearer now and that you, like me, can look forward to the  valuable addition of meadows at Hellens and the pleasure they will give.

 

David Maddison – Head Gardener

 

BEES

We keep bees here at Hellens and so sell our own honey in the shop. Please keep a lookout when

wandering around the gardens for the signs which tell you when you are approaching the hives.

 

HALLWOOD

In 2007 the PMM Charity Trust bought back Hallwood which, until sold in the early 20th century, had been part of the

estate since the Doomsday Book records. This is a site of great historical, archaeological, and scientific interest (SSSI).

In spring the woods are full of wild flowers – daffodils, orchids, anemones and bluebells.

There are also small-leafed lime and wild service trees in the wood, which invariably suggest very ancient woodland.

If you are visiting Hellens you are welcome to explore (carefully!) Hallwood, which is just a ten-minute walk from the house.

THE PHYSIC GARDEN

 

 was created in 2013 and is built in an octagonal shape to reflect our rare 17th century octagonal dovecote which it is nestled alongside. The eight beds are raised and accommodate herbs and plants relating to Psychiatric, Physical Medicine, Dying Plants (as in colour dyes), Poisonous Plants (BEWARE!), Folk Medicine, Olfactory / Smells and Still Room, Endangered plant and the Occult.

 

 POISONS, SPELLS AND SORCERY

Heed warning and learn stories of witchcraft and misfortune!

How a plant can kill, how long it would take you to die if you ate it

and how gruesome and painful the death might be.

European writers of the 16th and 17th centuries have written about witches' ‘flying ointment’ made from animal fats, the blood of bats or lapwings, toads and poisonous plants like these.

Aconitum napellus, Aconitum lycoctonum, artemesia absinthium, delphinium, dicentra alba, mandragora officinalum, atropa belladonna, agrostemma githago, polygonatum multiflorum, arum maculatum.

 

PSYCHOLOGICAL

For use in Psychiatry, relieving mental stress and treating psychological illnesses:

Valerian officinalis, papaver somniferum, eupatorium cannabinum, helleborous, hypericum perforatum,

echinacia purpurea, melissa officinalis, rosemarius officinalis, narcissus.

 

FIRST AID

Gentle herbal remedies for common ailments:

Chamemelum nobile, tanacetum parthenium, achillea millefolium,

stachys officinalis, symphytum, plantago lanceolata,

salvia officinalis, allium sativum.

 

PHARMACEUTICAL

Plants which yield therapeutic compounds of proven value in current

medicinal practice and that are in world-wide use today:

Digitalis lanata, rheum palmatum, papaver somniferum,

podophyllum hexandrum, podophyllum pellatum,

filipendula ulmaria, catharanthus roseus, digitalis.

 

SMELLS AND STILL ROOM

‘It was generally accepted that a fragrant smell was in itself proof against infection and many recipes in the still room books for perfumed powders and pou-pourris which would now be considered fripperies

had a serious underlying purpose.

Scented plants for perfumery, and Elizabethan strewing herbs:

Hyssopus officinalis, Dianthus ‘doris’, Iris germanica, Iris florentina, chamemelum nobile ‘flora pleno’,

Thymus ‘fragrantissima’, Aloysia triphylla, lavendula, pelagonium ‘attar of roses’, peonia.

 

DYESTUFFS

Plants which yield a colour that is used to dye wool and cloth:

Tanacetum vugare, isastis tinctoria, agrimonia eupatoria, sanguinaria canadensis, inula helenium, rubia tinctorium,

reseda luteola, anthemis tinctoria.

 

LOVE AND FERTILITY

Plants and herbs used for the reproductive system; Love potions, fertility charms, erotic herbs and childbirth remedies:

Paeonia lactiflora, artemesia abronatum, verbena officinalis,

levisticum officinale, achillea millefolium, papaver somniferum,

artemesia vulgaris, leonorus cardiaca.

 

NATIVE BRITISH BED

Old plants found in Gerard’s 1597 herbal:

Ajuga reptans (sicklwort), pulmonaria officinalis (lungwort), Primula veris (palseywort), saponaria officinalis (soapwort/ latherwort), althaea officinalis, doronicum pardalianches, viola tricolour.

The words ‘Wort’ and ‘herb’ were synonymous and the term common in old herbals and prevalent in the time of Chaucer until Shakespeare.

Much Marcle, Herefordshire, HR8 2LY, England               T. 01531 660504  –  info@hellensmanor.com

Much Marcle, Herefordshire, HR8 2LY, England               T. 01531 660504  –  info@hellensmanor.com

HELLENS

THE GARDENS

 

A romantic English Garden incorporating a rare 17th century octagonal dovecot, a physic garden,

a yew labyrinth, woodland and ponds, herb and kitchen gardens. Garden admission: £2.50 per person.

 

YEW LABYRINTH

The difference between a maze and a Labyrinth? You can’t get lost in a Labyrinth!

 

KNOT GARDEN

This is located on the East lawn and is inspired by designs from our James 1 over-mantle in the East Hall which was originally a bedhead.

 

ROSE GARDEN

On the north side of the House, several varieties alongside the greenhouses surrounded by many fruit trees.

 

TREES

Ranging from the ancient Wellingtonias, Blue Atlas Cedars to the many rare varieties of fruit trees.

 

DRIVEWAY (Monks Walk)

The Perry Pear trees which were planted as an avenue in 1702 to celebrate the coronation of Queen Anne, still survive. Most are Hellens Early variety but there is a rare Hellens Green and Waterlugg both of which we are trying to graft here to help preserve the species.

 

CREATION OF WILDFLOWER MEADOW

We have started the process of turning the grass verges on the driveway into wildflower meadows.  To do this, we have to remove the existing vegetation as neither the grass types or perennial weeds are conducive to the establishment of meadows.  We are using herbicide responsibly to achieve this.  We plan to begin the sowing of the new meadows in Autumn 2017.  For a period of about a year we at Hellens and our visitors will experience a little ‘pain’  in order that we can enjoy a much larger gain.  Not only will wildflower meadows  both sides of the drive look stunning  but also the greater diversity of flower species will enhance the environment for wildlife, especially pollinators. We intend to relay this information publicly, using ‘interpretation’ boards on the drive. I hope our intentions are clearer now and that you, like me, can look forward to the  valuable addition of meadows at Hellens and the pleasure they will give.

 

David Maddison – Head Gardener

 

BEES

We keep bees here at Hellens and so sell our own honey in the shop. Please keep a lookout when

wandering around the gardens for the signs which tell you when you are approaching the hives.

 

HALLWOOD

In 2007 the PMM Charity Trust bought back Hallwood which, until sold in the early 20th century, had been part of the

estate since the Doomsday Book records. This is a site of great historical, archaeological, and scientific interest (SSSI).

In spring the woods are full of wild flowers – daffodils, orchids, anemones and bluebells.

There are also small-leafed lime and wild service trees in the wood, which invariably suggest very ancient woodland.

If you are visiting Hellens you are welcome to explore (carefully!) Hallwood, which is just a ten-minute walk from the house.

 

The Physic Garden

 was created in 2013 and is built in an octagonal shape to reflect our rare 17th century octagonal dovecote which it is nestled alongside. The eight beds are raised and accommodate herbs and plants relating to Psychiatric, Physical Medicine, Dying Plants (as in colour dyes), Poisonous Plants (BEWARE!), Folk Medicine, Olfactory / Smells and Still Room, Endangered plant and the Occult.

 

 POISONS, SPELLS AND SORCERY

Heed warning and learn stories of witchcraft and misfortune!

How a plant can kill, how long it would take you to die if you ate it

and how gruesome and painful the death might be.

European writers of the 16th and 17th centuries have written about witches' ‘flying ointment’ made from animal fats, the blood of bats or lapwings, toads and poisonous plants like these.

Aconitum napellus, Aconitum lycoctonum, artemesia absinthium, delphinium, dicentra alba, mandragora officinalum, atropa belladonna, agrostemma githago, polygonatum multiflorum, arum maculatum.

 

PSYCHOLOGICAL

For use in Psychiatry, relieving mental stress and treating psychological illnesses:

Valerian officinalis, papaver somniferum, eupatorium cannabinum, helleborous, hypericum perforatum,

echinacia purpurea, melissa officinalis, rosemarius officinalis, narcissus.

 

FIRST AID

Gentle herbal remedies for common ailments:

Chamemelum nobile, tanacetum parthenium, achillea millefolium,

stachys officinalis, symphytum, plantago lanceolata,

salvia officinalis, allium sativum.

 

PHARMACEUTICAL

Plants which yield therapeutic compounds of proven value in current

medicinal practice and that are in world-wide use today:

Digitalis lanata, rheum palmatum, papaver somniferum,

podophyllum hexandrum, podophyllum pellatum,

filipendula ulmaria, catharanthus roseus, digitalis.

 

SMELLS AND STILL ROOM

‘It was generally accepted that a fragrant smell was in itself proof against infection and many recipes in the still room books for perfumed powders and pou-pourris which would now be considered fripperies

had a serious underlying purpose.

Scented plants for perfumery, and Elizabethan strewing herbs:

Hyssopus officinalis, Dianthus ‘doris’, Iris germanica, Iris florentina, chamemelum nobile ‘flora pleno’,

Thymus ‘fragrantissima’, Aloysia triphylla, lavendula, pelagonium ‘attar of roses’, peonia.

 

DYESTUFFS

Plants which yield a colour that is used to dye wool and cloth:

Tanacetum vugare, isastis tinctoria, agrimonia eupatoria, sanguinaria canadensis, inula helenium, rubia tinctorium,

reseda luteola, anthemis tinctoria.

 

LOVE AND FERTILITY

Plants and herbs used for the reproductive system; Love potions, fertility charms, erotic herbs and childbirth remedies:

Paeonia lactiflora, artemesia abronatum, verbena officinalis,

levisticum officinale, achillea millefolium, papaver somniferum,

artemesia vulgaris, leonorus cardiaca.

 

NATIVE BRITISH BED

Old plants found in Gerard’s 1597 herbal:

Ajuga reptans (sicklwort), pulmonaria officinalis (lungwort), Primula veris (palseywort), saponaria officinalis (soapwort/ latherwort), althaea officinalis, doronicum pardalianches, viola tricolour.

The words ‘Wort’ and ‘herb’ were synonymous and the term common in old herbals and prevalent in the time of Chaucer until Shakespeare.

Much Marcle, Herefordshire, HR8 2LY, England

T. 01531 660504  –  info@hellensmanor.com

The Physic Garden

 was created in 2013 and is built in an octagonal shape to reflect our rare 17th century octagonal dovecote which it is nestled alongside. The eight beds are raised and accommodate herbs and plants relating to Psychiatric, Physical Medicine, Dying Plants (as in colour dyes), Poisonous Plants (BEWARE!), Folk Medicine, Olfactory / Smells and Still Room, Endangered plant and the Occult.

 

 POISONS, SPELLS AND SORCERY

Heed warning and learn stories of witchcraft and misfortune!

How a plant can kill, how long it would take you to die if you ate it

and how gruesome and painful the death might be.

European writers of the 16th and 17th centuries have written about witches' ‘flying ointment’ made from animal fats, the blood of bats or lapwings, toads and poisonous plants like these.

Aconitum napellus, Aconitum lycoctonum, artemesia absinthium, delphinium, dicentra alba, mandragora officinalum, atropa belladonna, agrostemma githago, polygonatum multiflorum, arum maculatum.

 

PSYCHOLOGICAL

For use in Psychiatry, relieving mental stress and treating psychological illnesses:

Valerian officinalis, papaver somniferum, eupatorium cannabinum, helleborous, hypericum perforatum,

echinacia purpurea, melissa officinalis, rosemarius officinalis, narcissus.

 

FIRST AID

Gentle herbal remedies for common ailments:

Chamemelum nobile, tanacetum parthenium, achillea millefolium,

stachys officinalis, symphytum, plantago lanceolata,

salvia officinalis, allium sativum.

 

PHARMACEUTICAL

Plants which yield therapeutic compounds of proven value in current

medicinal practice and that are in world-wide use today:

Digitalis lanata, rheum palmatum, papaver somniferum,

podophyllum hexandrum, podophyllum pellatum,

filipendula ulmaria, catharanthus roseus, digitalis.

 

SMELLS AND STILL ROOM

‘It was generally accepted that a fragrant smell was in itself proof against infection and many recipes in the still room books for perfumed powders and pou-pourris which would now be considered fripperies

had a serious underlying purpose.

Scented plants for perfumery, and Elizabethan strewing herbs:

Hyssopus officinalis, Dianthus ‘doris’, Iris germanica, Iris florentina, chamemelum nobile ‘flora pleno’,

Thymus ‘fragrantissima’, Aloysia triphylla, lavendula, pelagonium ‘attar of roses’, peonia.

 

DYESTUFFS

Plants which yield a colour that is used to dye wool and cloth:

Tanacetum vugare, isastis tinctoria, agrimonia eupatoria, sanguinaria canadensis, inula helenium, rubia tinctorium,

reseda luteola, anthemis tinctoria.

 

LOVE AND FERTILITY

Plants and herbs used for the reproductive system; Love potions, fertility charms, erotic herbs and childbirth remedies:

Paeonia lactiflora, artemesia abronatum, verbena officinalis,

levisticum officinale, achillea millefolium, papaver somniferum,

artemesia vulgaris, leonorus cardiaca.

 

NATIVE BRITISH BED

Old plants found in Gerard’s 1597 herbal:

Ajuga reptans (sicklwort), pulmonaria officinalis (lungwort), Primula veris (palseywort), saponaria officinalis (soapwort/ latherwort), althaea officinalis, doronicum pardalianches, viola tricolour.

The words ‘Wort’ and ‘herb’ were synonymous and the term common in old herbals and prevalent in the time of Chaucer until Shakespeare.

Much Marcle, Herefordshire, HR8 2LY, England               T. 01531 660504  –  info@hellensmanor.com